Archive Page 7

How hard is it to identify radio footprints?

How hard is it to identify radio footprints?
I asked yesterday but part of my question didn’t appear for some reason. Having the first half of this explained in a way that made sense, I now have another question on it……
How hard is it for someone’s 2-way radio to be identified and under what circumstances would anyone bother to try? I mean, if you’re messing with police, fire, rescue, airplane towers, etc., yeah Uncle Charlie is going to waste no time enlisting the help of probably every amateur operator, military and police officer to help find the guy. But even then they’d need a court order to seize & examine the radio equipment and then prove in court it was HIM that did it. Wouldn’t they have to do major internal radio surgery to determine what radio it came from? What about my theoretical 4000 watt CB to step on people 5 States away? But unless you’re going into major illegal activity as mentioned, is the FCC going to care?
(Notice now people….I said THEORETICAL -I’m still lucky I don’t blow something up turning it on! :) I certainly can’t try to build one.) I’ve just heard so much about footprints on 2 way radios and such, I was just wondering how much trouble one has to go through to FIND and then PROVE what radio it is. And is the bigger the radio the easier it is to I.D.? (Like my 4000 watt CB?)
There are things against Part 95 Subpart D that I’ve seen going on for quite some time and when I wrote Uncle Charlie (which people on CB have used at least in my area for years), his response was in not so many words, as I’m reading that, unless you’re reporting a Federal crime it’s being used for or risking harm to life because of interfering with police, etc. don’t look for anything within the next 30 years.
As for the 3 or 4 thousand watt thing, again, theoretically (keyword) speaking, could it be done? Obviously not with a mag. mount mobile antenna *sizzle sizzle, melt melt* but if, say you could get your hands on industrial size capacitors, a 90 or 100 Amp. breaker for your main box downstairs some #2 solid core wire a 6′ X 6′ heat shield & a 100′ steel rod/antenna, could it be done?
John: Yeah, Part 95 Subpart D 95.426 (#26) But it says “….for inspection” NOT seizure, etc. Just watch someone bring up that argument in court someday with the way things are nowadays. :)
Question is, when was the last time that happened unless of course it was interfering with emergency personnel, or planes or commercial radio stations? (At least by me they don’t even care about 95.407 (b) #7 anymore.) Maybe they monitor more in certain States but they haven’t been by mine in decades. Odd why the Smokey Bears :) don’t have the power to enforce this stuff. That would help!

By Steve Dogan -06-10 11:27:09

Answers:

classicsat: I don’t know too much about identifying a particular transmitter by a unique fingerprint or signature, but I wouldn’t put it beyond modern laboratory grade equipment the FCC would have. But if they can grab signature in the field, they can just as easily do it in the lab, non-destructively.

More “pedestrian” is triangulating the transmitter site, which nearly anybody can do with a directional antenna.

Yes, in practice you could build a 4000W 11M transmitter and antenna, if you really knew how, and if the FCC gets complaints, they may investigate.

John: No court order is required to seize equipment. CB rules state by operating a CB radio, you agree to allow your station to be open to FCC inspection at any time. all other radio services also include this statement when you agree to get a license. FCC actions, including fines require no court action, unless the violator refuses to pay a fine, and the action is submitted to the court system for collection.

Radio footprinting software is available, and can be used to ID transmitters…. However, simple direction finding techniques can isolate a specific location. Hams do it all the time to catch violators.

Illegal CBers have been known to be caught and fined for interfering with services outside their services, since their equipment is so dirty that it transmits harmonics, which are transmissions on other frequencies olongside of the ones they are tuned to…. Someone in alaska was recently fined for interfering with air traffic control frequencies.

Best bet is to stay legal. 25 million other people could get away with it… but when you get hit with that $10000 fine… you are stuck paying it… not those 25 million other people.

Can an American citizen enter Canada with a DUI charge?

Can an American citizen enter Canada with a DUI charge?
I am American-born living in Canada and my dad is an American living in the US and got a DUI charge there. Yes, I know it is a stupid thing of him to do. Would he not be able to enter Canada even without intending to drive?

By ..Chris_Is_ -09-24 03:15:57

Answers:

Randy: Its considered acriminal offence in Canada and as such he’s deemed inadmissible.

bw022: That depends on a few factors.

By law, one is criminally inadmissible to Canada if they were convicted of an offense, which if committed in Canada, carries a maximum sentence of indictment. The equivalent charge in Canada is impaired driving and is an indictable offense. He can not enter Canada under the US visa-exemption status.

There are two ways around criminal inadmissibility. The first, apply for criminal rehabilitation at the Canadian embassy or consulate. You must declare your record, provide details, pay a fee, and (if accepted) wait five years with no further offenses. Canada will then mark a single offense are rehabilitated and it won’t count towards entering Canada. Only minor offenses (such as DUI) can be marked as rehabilitated. The second, is to apply at the embassy/consulate for a temporary residency permit (TRP). You must declare your record, provide details, provide a reason you need to enter Canada, and pay a fee. If accepted, Canada may grant an exception and permit a single trip into Canada — although usually only for a specific period of time. You would need one each time you wish to visit Canada.

In 2012, Canada relaxed the requirements for applying for a temporary residency permit (TRP) for Americans. They now permit Americans to apply at the border and they’ll wave the $200 fee. However, this is limited to certain crimes (DWI, shoplifting, mischief, etc.) and can only be granted if you are convicted of a single crime, did not receive any jail time, and have completely your full sentence. It is also a one-time exception. Any further TRPs must be obtained through the embassy/consulate or you need to apply for rehabilitation.

Upon arriving at the border, you must declare your criminal record and ask to apply for a TRP. You should have both your arrest and sentencing reports with you. Also, expect this to take some time, so I would recommend phoning ahead to the CBSA crossing and not having any time sensitive plans — connecting flights, etc. The CBSA person can also let you know what to expect.

Jim B: Being “charged ” is NOT the same as being “Convicted “. Was he convicted in the USA of drunk driving ?

If so, he is un-admissible to Canada, as we view that as being a “felony ” type of conviction in Canada.

Sorry you will have to go there, to see him.

Jim B

Toronto.,

Cartersville Family Lawyer | Juvenile Offenses

Cartersville Family Lawyer | Juvenile Offenses

Do you really need an attorney for a juvenile offense? http://www.northgafamilylawyer.com.

San Diego Violent Crime Attorney | 619.333.8108 | Criminal Lawyer

San Diego Violent Crime Attorney | 619.333.8108 | Criminal Lawyer

http://LawFirm-SanDiego.com/criminal-defense/adw-assault-with-a-deadly-weapon/ | San Diego Violent Crime Attorney | 619.333.8108 | Criminal Defense Lawyer in…

Padilla Vacate Criminal Convictions Post Conviction Relief, Post-Conviction Relief, PCR

Padilla Vacate Criminal Convictions Post Conviction Relief, Post-Conviction Relief, PCR

RI and MA immigration lawyer discusses Padilla v. Kentucky, the decision which vacated (did away with) the conviction / plea of a defendant whose criminal de…

Criminal Law #8: Crimes Against Property – Theft Crimes

Criminal Law #8: Crimes Against Property – Theft Crimes

Chapter 8: Crimes Against Property – Theft Crimes Part 2 of 2.

What are the charges for a juvenile caught stealing alcohol?

What are the charges for a juvenile caught stealing alcohol?
The other night me and three friends were caught stealing 7 thirty packs of beer, I was given a minor in possession while driving, petty theft robbery, running a stop sign, and having a fake I.D. I’d like to know if the robbery is a felony or misdemeanor. I’ve had two warnings and about a year ago a friend and I were given a minor in possession. So what am I looking at? I’m 17.

By Espiee -03-29 06:52:30

Answers:

FRAGINAL-NOYPI: The minor will be placed under rehabilitation when caught stealing alcohol.

Los Angeles Theft Crimes Lawyers – Takakjian & Sitkoff, LLP

Los Angeles Theft Crimes Lawyers – Takakjian & Sitkoff, LLP

Theft Crimes http://www.formerdistrictattorneys.com/criminal-defense/theft-crimes/ Takakjian & Sitkoff, LLP is made up of two former prosecutors who understa…

Why are offenses against people considered crimes against the state?

Why are offenses against people considered crimes against the state?
Such as theft, assault, murder, etc. Why are they not crimes against that person? Why can’t the person wronged or their surviving family be the ones whom the crime has been committed against? They could decide the punishment IF the suspect is proven guilty in a court of law. They could also pardon the person as well if they forgave them enough. Such as a person committing assault: What if the victim forgives the offender? The only crimes against the state that should exist are crimes against government institutions or property. Traffic violations could also be said to be a form of state crime. I think everything is too much about the government and not focused enough on the people. Not everything is about order. Sometimes things are too personal to be called a crime against the state. If someone I care about was murdered, and the culprit was caught, and found guilty, I know I would get more closure out of choosing the sentence than a judge doing it. I am the one who was wronged, not the judge, not the state, not the fucking president. ME. If I want him hanged, drawn, and quartered, so be it. I’ll hire third world mercenaries to be the executioners if the state thinks it’s too brutal for an American executioner to carry out.

By SO FRAIL -01-12 04:29:58

Answers:

NeilSherman: Because, like all children, politicians and lawyers get spiteful when they’re told “No”. And the US Constitution tells ‘m “No” more than 85 times. That’s one helluvalot of spitework to hafta do!

Do you know of any good criminal defense attorneys in Michigan?